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Cooking Methods

 

 

 
  Braising
 

 

 

Definition

 

Braising is defined as the cooking of whole food or large cuts in a covered container with an appropriate amount of liquid which forms the basis of the sauce to accompany the dish. Braising usually takes place in an oven

 

 

Purpose

 

To cook meat that is too tough to roast but does not need to be cut into small pieces. Also to tenderise vegetables which contain tough cellulose.

 

Braising, like stewing, is a long slow process which converts and softens the collagen; it also retains water soluble vitamins and minerals.

 

Rice can be braised when the liquor e.g. stock is to be absorbed.

 

Large cuts of offal are also appropriate for braising.

 

 

There are two main methods of braising:

 

1.      Brown Braising where the food is browned beforehand and dark ingredients such as brown stock or other red meat, or red wine are used.

 

2.      White Braising where the food is blanched, refreshed and cooked in a white liquid such as white stock

 

Advantages

Older, tougher, cheaper joints of meat and poultry can be used

Maximum flavour and nutritive value are retained

Variety of presentation and flavour is given to the menu

 

Disadvantages

Slow

 

Examples of foods which you might choose to cook by braising:

 

Farinaceous        rice

Meat                    lamb - hearts, chops

Meat                    beef - olives, joints, liver

 

Poultry                duck

 

Vegetables          celery, onions