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Sago

 

Sago_Palm_Trees.jpg

Sago is a powdery starch made from the processed pith found inside the trunks of the Sago Palm Metroxylon sagu. The genus name Metroxylon is derived from Greek and means heartwood, while the species name sagu is from a local name for the food. Sago forms a major staple food for the lowland peoples of New Guinea and the Moluccas where it is often cooked and eaten as a form of pancake with fish.

 

Sago looks like tapioca and both are pearly grains of starch, but tapioca is made from the root of the cassava plant. They are similar but are not identical when used in recipes

 

Sago flour is nearly pure carbohydrate and has very little protein, vitamins, or minerals. However, as sago palms are typically found in areas unsuited for other forms of agriculture, sago cultivation is often the most ecologically appropriate form of land-use, and the nutritional deficiencies of the food can often be compensated for with other readily available foods.

 

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One hundred grams of dry sago yields 100 calories, including an average of 94 grams of carbohydrate, 0.2 grams of protein, 0.5 grams of dietary fibre, 10mg of calcium, 1.2mg of iron, and negligible amounts of fat, carotene, thiamine, and ascorbic acid.

 

It's used in baking, to make puddings or as a thickener for desserts

 

Sago can be stored for weeks or months, although it is generally eaten soon after it is processed