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Name:

Bok Choy

Variety:

 

Family

Cabbage

Availability:

Year round

Character:

Bok Choy has roundish, dark green leaves that look like crinkled spinach, and crunchy, white stalks. When cooked, it has a sweet flavour and its stalks are firm.

Use:

Bok Choy is mainly used in Asian cooking, though it is starting slowly to make the "fusion" crossover into Western cooking. It hasn't yet acquired a Westernized name, so the anglicized version of the Chinese name is still used. You can cook Bok Choy, or use it raw in a salad.

Quality Points:

Stems should be firm and leaves should have good colour - tops of leaves may be a little limp

Storage:

Refrigerate in plastic bags. Use promptly.

Preparation:

Trim and discard the base and any bad leaves; Separate the stalks, wash and drain; Slice, chop or shred leaves based on what your recipes require. Chop stalks as well

Cooking Method:

Cook almost as you would a cabbage -- you can steam, boil, fry, microwave, stir-fry or sauté it, either by itself or with other items.

History:

 

Nutrition:

1/2 cup (55 g) contains 10 calories, a good calcium source and is high in Vitamins C and A. Contains no fat or cholesterol and is low in sodium.

Comment:

 Baby Bok Choy is just a younger version of Bok Choy, harvested when it is about 6 inches tall (15 cm.) Its flavour is sweeter and milder than full-sized Bok Choy. The stalks are white.

Baby Bok Choy usually costs more than regular Bok Choy, so it doesn't make any sense to buy it for a recipe that requires Bok Choy to be shredded or chopped into bits -- regular Bok Choy will do.

Baby Bok Choy is so tender that you can cook it whole or in halves to serve as a side dish (often served in oyster sauce.)