Home

Spinach

Brussels Sprouts

Cabbage

Swiss Chard

Bok Choy

Chicory

Watercress

Lettuce

Endive

Kale

Vegetables

 

Name:

Cabbage

Variety:

Green, Red or White

Smooth or Crinkled

Round or Oval

Family

Brassica

Availability:

Year round

Character:

Taste variations are subtle.

Use:

Cabbages are delicious either raw or cooked for a short time until tender, but still slightly crisp. Serve as soon as possible after cooking.  Shredded cabbage is the key ingredient of coleslaw, which when teamed with a variety of other ingredients, is a very popular salad. Cabbage leaves, red or green, can be used as a leaf wrapping, stuff with a savoury filling and simmer in liquid until tender. Sauerkraut is a delicious pickled cabbage dish.

Quality Points:

Firm heads that are heavy for their size with even colour and crisp outer leaves will be best.

Storage:

Refrigerate in plastic bags

Preparation:

Sometimes outer leaves are a bit tough, so remove them and any other coarse or damaged leaves. Shred coarsely or finely.

Cooking Method:

Boil

Stir-fry

Microwave

History:

Cabbages are one of the oldest vegetables known. Throughout their long history they have often been thought of as food for the poor.

Nutrition:

Cabbages are an excellent source of vitamin C, a good source of fibre and folate.

Comment:

GREEN CABBAGE:
These are the most widely grown and available all year round with a range of varieties which ensure a continuous supply. Drumhead is a popular variety with smooth compact leaves. Savoy has crinkly leaves with very good flavour.

RED CABBAGE:
These are hard, tightly packed and crisp with dark red or crimson leaves. Traditionally they are cooked longer than green cabbages. Lemon juice, wine or vinegar must be added to preserve the lovely red colour when cooked. They grow all year round but are more plentiful in autumn and winter.

CAVOLONERO:
Cavolonero means ‘black cabbage’ in Italian. It is a member of the cabbage family and is non-hearting with long strap-like leaves. The leaves are very like savoy cabbage in texture – knobbly! It is blue-green coloured which cooks to an intense silver beet green. When cooked it keeps its form and does not mush. Because the leaves are quite strong it does require a bit of cooking to develop both the texture and the sweetness. Cavolonero can be used in much the same way as you would other cabbage varieties, or in dishes with a distinct Italian flavour like Tuscan soup or with pasta and parmesan. At this stage cavolonero is quite exclusive, and whilst becoming widely known in the food industry, you will probably be unlikely to find it at your local greengrocer or supermarket. Cavolonero is a winter crop so is most likely to be found from late September until the end of April.